Joint & Bone Initiative

Dr. Emily Lalone

lalone
Assistant Professor
Mechanical and Materials Engineering
Surgery

emily.lalone@uwo.ca 
Website

MSK Research Areas of Interest

Arthritis, Assistive Technologies, Bioengineering, Biomechanics, Clinical Outcomes, Implantable & Wearable Devices, Knowledge Translation & Mobilization, Mobility, Muscle Disorders, Musculoskeletal Imaging, Orthopaedic Surgery, Rehabilitation, Sport Medicine

Dr. Lalone completed her BSc (Medical Science 2007) and her PhD (Biomedical Engineering 2012) at Western University. Her doctoral work was completed under the supervision of Dr. James Johnson, Dr. Graham King and Dr. Terry Peters in the Bioengineering Research Laboratory at the Roth|McFarlane Hand and Upper Limb Centre where she developed an imaging technique to examine in vitro joint contact mechanics.  She then completed a CIHR Fellowship at McMaster University in the School of Rehabilitation Sciences.

Dr. Lalone's research interests are both interdisciplinary and translational and involves using research from Biomedical and Mechanical Engineering, Medical Imaging, Orthopedic Surgery and Rehabilitation. The goal of her research is to integrate biomechanical and imaging innovations to understand human joint structure and function. Emily’s research program strives to develop biomedical and imaging innovations that offer new diagnostic and treatment technologies that improve health and quality of life in patients with musculoskeletal problems.  Her specific research interests are in human orthopedic biomechanics with special focus on joint contact mechanics and joint kinematics.

Now in the Mechanical and Materials Engineering Department at Western University, Emily will be examining in vivo human biomechanics and examine dynamic joint contact mechanics while people perform standard and complex tasks. Emily also plans to leverage her interest in Rehabilitative Sciences to also develop interventions for primary prevention of MSK disorders, solutions for self-care strategies for patients and quantitative functional outcome measures of joint motion.